Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Fashmob VIII Asheville, KatDog Couture Sequences

KatDog Couture Hoodress, Model - IVY, Fashmob VIII Asheville, photo+art JHH

KatDog Couture Hoodress, Model - IVY, Fashmob VIII Asheville, photo+art JHH

KatDog Couture Hoodress, Model - IVY, Fashmob VIII Asheville, photo+art JHH

KatDog Couture Hoodress, Models - lower right L to R: Michelle Raymond, Samantha Singleton, IVY,
 Fashmob VIII Asheville, photos+art JHH

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Mothlight - Fashion Bath, Pretty Pretty 7/23/16

Fashion Bath's perceptive pace modulations and surging, cohesive electric metal, bass, drum and vocals kicked the Mothlight - Asheville crowd into motion. Following "two more bangers", Pretty Pretty took the stage - formulating the precise environment conducive to creative movement: electronic beats, percussive vocals and twanging liquid guitar building and pairing unexpectedly. Live show advantage - observing the music move through Fashion Bath's drummer Sean Coughlin on the dancefloor, or watching Pretty Pretty's JB Bowles channel sound behind the keyboard. Hear Fashion Bath here - from the Give It album - try Give It, Lost Love, and Frenulum. See a Pretty Pretty Boots and Stoots performance here.

Friday, July 22, 2016

Asheville Fashmob 8, Salvage Station

Photos from this excellent venue with great faces, models, designers and top-notch interaction:

Model - Betsabe Fregoso at Fashmob 8 Asheville, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation

Apparel - Bandito Rockabilly, Designer - Elisabeth Hamilton-Ferrand, photo JHH
Apparel - Arteries by Designer Stina Anderson, Model - Kalie Patton, Braids - Moira Ziolkowski, photo JHH
Model - Camille Reid, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation

Model - Camille Reid, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation at Fashmob 8 Asheville
Model - IVY in a KatDog Couture hoodress by Designer Kati Foster, Fashmob 8 Asheville

Kati Foster's KatDog Couture Hoodress, model IVY, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation

KatDog Couture Hoodresses, models left to right - Michelle Raymond, Samantha Singleton, IVY

KatDog Couture Hoodresses, models left to right - Michelle Raymond, Samantha Singleton, IVY
Model - Victoria Rae, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation, Asheville Fashmob 8
Model - Audra Gaiziunas wearing Royal Peasantry by Designer Daniella Miller at Asheville Fashmob 8
Model - Satori Kirsch at Asheville Fashmob 8, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation
Model - IVY in Designer Rachel Friel's Hip Remix Skirt, photo JHH at Asheville Fashmob 8
Canine Model - Aloysius living large at Asheville Fashmob 8, photo - JHH for Art Fashion Creation
Model, Skateboarder - Martin Murray, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation at Salvage Station Asheville

Model, Skateboarder - Martin Murray, photo JHH for Art Fashion Creation at Salvage Station Asheville

Monday, July 11, 2016

Nurturing Creative Minds

Encouragement for an artist is like water to a flower - encouragement makes an artist bloom. A kind word, a smile, a positive note are apt to make all the difference in someone's day. Among the clutter on my desk, I retrieved a newspaper clipping which seemed so appropriate and most likely inspired this post.

In my travels, I saved an article entitled "The Arts Thrive Only if We Support Them" by Scott McLeod for Smoky Mountain News. McLeod opens with a statement by Kari Rinn, Haywood Community College director of Creative Arts - who says, "The arts teach us to appreciate beauty, to make visible our thoughts, ideas and inspirations and to continually problem solve. These are important life skills that apply to every aspect of community, family and business. The survival of the arts is paramount to our happiness and also our innovation." As a lifelong illustrator and observer and maker-of-things, this small, square newspaper clipping brightened my day today - just as it did the day I first saw it.

In addition to its encouraging words, the article also brought to attention the simple fact that low budgets are forcing public schools to eliminate their arts programs. McLeod reminds us that our forefathers deemed the arts and sciences equally important. But the present day poses a conundrum - as art, music, architecture, languages, theatre and so on are oft considered less significant and therefore receive less funding and less votes.

Essentially - among us - the dreamers and makers of things are placed in an environment which is not conducive to survival.

To end on a positive note though, it is paramount that artists support each other. From a recent workshop experience, I personally realize the power of loving community. When artists encourage each other, they are empowered and inspired to also nurture others.   

Thursday, June 30, 2016

From My Art Journal

Predominantly collage, mixed media:

Wonder, photo collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock

Susurrus, stitched collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock
stitched collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock

stitched collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock
collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock
sunlight through stitched collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock
stitched fashion collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, Toile La La
mail art collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock

detail, mail art collage - Jennifer Hawkins Hock
Scent of Rembrandt Red, collage with reverse text - Jennifer Hawkins Hock
 
stitched mail art - art fashion creation


stitched mail art - art fashion creation

Thursday, June 23, 2016

My Best Blogging Moments in Art and Fashion

Via blog editorship, I've certainly enjoyed life to a much fuller extent than I would as a random bystander. Blogging is the impetus navigating a continual search for creativity and subject matter for intriguing posts. At the end of this post, you'll find a few links to some of my favorite blogging moments. 

For six years I've maintained Art Fashion Creation and Toile La La, but you'll also find posts at the Wordpress blog dressesandhats. Too, you may remember the blog Better Shell Fitness, to which I contributed fitness reviews.  At these blogs, you'll also find reviews for fashion shows/exhibits, museums, travel, books, and music - all written in my nom de plume - Toile La La. The name Toile La La (pronounced twahl-lah-lah) originated from experiments in half-scale sewing and I kept it as a pen name because I enjoy the pronunciation.

Blogging is good motivation for exploring my own creative capacity.  During six blogging years, in addition to stitching those first half-scale design toiles, my art/fashion adventures include:
  • millinery
  • a hand-bound (coptic-stitched ) book and a more condensed zine titled 80s Fashion Design Book 1: Drawn
  • the recent exhibit 2D to 3D: Artist Room Studies
  • fashion fiction, quick fiction, and interior fiction 
  • fashion collage and stitched collage
  • mail art and stitched wordsmithing
  • the F/W 2014 Romantic Souls fashion show
  • the S/S 2015 Spontaneous Now fashion show and video
  • the Advance A/H  F/W 15/16 L'Oeil Creatif a L'Avance fashion show
All told, it is my greatest pleasure to converse with other creatives. I feel I must almost glow with fascination during an interview - as my senses are so fully engaged. The following links lead you to my interviews with a variety of women - artists/designers/writers - all, women who inspire me with a particular eye, intelligence, written voice, or humor.

Monday, June 20, 2016

2D to 3D: Artist Room Studies, Jennifer Hawkins Hock

To emphasize a captured moment in the daily life and environment of these artists is my goal; to spotlight their appreciation for the art found in something as simple as a good meal, a window view, flowers in a vase, the silhouette of a chair, placement of a book, or the casting of light and shadow. When you compare my room studies to their respective paintings, you'll notice here and there little discrepancies. It is of course part of the pleasure of observing these representations - spotting the differences. 

You might consider too the passing of time as you view my room studies - how even in your own environment, there occurs an evolution - a transition or a shifting of the elements therein. Some rooms seem to beckon guests... tables well-dressed with food and service, fresh flowers in a vase. In three of the rooms which originally contained people, I chose to reflect this passage of time - adding another element to the story the original paintings tell. You will notice instead of an orange - its peeling; a man reading the paper is now prepared for a stroll; or instead of a man peering through a doorway - a woman peeling potatoes is there instead.

I am delighted by Henri Matisse's rooms which are like diaries and I feel especially drawn to Edouard Vuillard's worktable - with its sewing project ready to be finished - a room full of fabric and potential. Gwen John's room, with its oddly slanted wall-feature, is a favorite - because I think it has all one really needs for a brief, restorative bit of enjoyment: a nice comfortable chair, flowers, a window - for fresh air and a view, and a practical small table - big enough for writing or holding a cup of tea, with a drawer to store something special - a book, or a letter.  

All the objects on walls, tables, shelves - all the elements of the original paintings are there because the artist deemed them visually significant. However, you might also consider how an artist may alter the actual room for its portrait.  

In recreating these paintings and setting the decor just so, I noticed interesting similarities in the rooms. So many of them feature open windows or doors - allowing the viewer to see beyond the immediate interior - framing a city scene, the blue sky and grass of nature, or sometimes a balcony.

I tried to avoid too many conceits or liberties, but there are a few. In Childe Hassam's room, the red table has such a perfect amount of reflection on top - a nice shine - I didn't want to change it. Too, I cannot verify what is under the table of Misia and Vallotton's table. My eyes see what I think is a cat - maybe even a cat with kittens... perhaps a cat is what I want to see. It is my hope you will now take a closer look and decide for yourself.
Artist Room Study 1 Dufy - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Table Devant une Fenetre Ouverte - Raoul Dufy, without date

Artist Room Study 2 Vuillard - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Misia and Vallotton at Villeneuve - Edouard Vuillard, 1899

Artist Room Study 3 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Pink Studio - Henri Matisse, 1911
Artist Room Study 4 Childe Hassam - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

The Breakfast Room, Winter Morning - Frederick Childe Hassam, 1911

Artist Room Study 5 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Artist Room Study 5 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

L'Atelier du Quai St. Michel - Henri Matisse, 1916

Artist Room Study 6 Caillebotte - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Interior of a Studio with Stove - Gustave Caillebotte, 1874
Artist Room Study 7 Bonnard - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

La Table - Pierre Bonnard, 1925

Artist Room Study 8 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Red Studio - Henri Matisse, 1911

Artist Room Study 9 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Interior, Flowers and Parakeets - Henri Matisse, 1924

Artist Room Study 10 Van Gogh - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Bedroom in Arles - Vincent van Gogh, 1888
Artist Room Study 11 Magritte - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Artist Room Study 11 Magritte - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

L'Homme au Journal - Rene Magritte, 1928

Artist Room Study 12 Gwen John - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

A Corner of the Artist's Room in Paris - Gwen John, 1907-1909
Artist Room Study Vuillard Worktable - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Artist Room Study Vuillard Worktable - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

The Suitor (Interior with Worktable) - Edouard Vuillard, 1893
Artist Room Study 14 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Grand Interieur, Nice - Matisse, 1920

Artist Room Study 15 Hammershoi - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2012/2014

Interieur Strandgade 30, 1901 - Vilhelm Hammershoi